Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (July 1, 1646 – November 14, 1716), was a German philoshopher and mathemathician. He wrote in multiple languages, Latin, French and German.

Gottfried

Leibniz Quotes:

-It is God who is the ultimate reason of things, and the knowledge of God is no less the beginning of science than his essence and will are the beginning of beings.

-Music is the pleasure the human mind experiences from counting without being aware that it is counting.

-To love is to place our happiness in the happiness of another.

-But in simple substances the influence of one monad over another is ideal only.

-Finally there are simple ideas of which no definition can be given; there are also axioms or postulates, or in a word primary principles, which cannot be proved and have no need of proof.
Gottfried Leibniz

-For since it is impossible for a created monad to have a physical influence on the inner nature of another, this is the only way in which one can be dependent on another.

-I also take it as granted that every created thing, and consequently the created monad also, is subject to change, and indeed that this change is continual in each one.

-I do not conceive of any reality at all as without genuine unity.

-I hold that the mark of a genuine idea is that its possibility can be proved, either a priori by conceiving its cause or reason, or a posteriori when experience teaches us that it is in fact in nature.

-I maintain also that substances, whether material or immaterial, cannot be conceived in their bare essence without any activity, activity being of the essence of substance in general.

-Indeed every monad must be different from every other. For there are never in nature two beings, which are precisely alike, and in which it is not possible to find some difference which is internal, or based on some intrinsic quality.

-It can have its effect only through the intervention of God, inasmuch as in the ideas of God a monad rightly demands that God, in regulating the rest from the beginning of things, should have regard to itself.

-It follows from what we have just said, that the natural changes of monads come from an internal principle, since an external cause would be unable to influence their inner being.

-Men act like brutes in so far as the sequences of their perceptions arise through the principle of memory only, like those empirical physicians who have mere practice without theory.

-Now where there are no parts, there neither extension, nor shape, nor divisibility is possible. And these monads are the true atoms of nature and, in a word, the elements of things.

-The ultimate reason of things must lie in a necessary substance, in which the differentiation of the changes only exists eminently as in their source; and this is what we call God.

-There are also two kinds of truths: truth of reasoning and truths of fact. Truths of reasoning are necessary and their opposite is impossible; those of fact are contingent and their opposite is possible.

-This is why the ultimate reason of things must lie in a necessary substance, in which the differentiation of the changes only exists eminently as in their source; and this is what we call God.

-When a truth is necessary, the reason for it can be found by analysis, that is, by resolving it into simpler ideas and truths until the primary ones are reached.

-Whence it follows that God is absolutely perfect, since perfection is nothing but magnitude of positive reality, in the strict sense, setting aside the limits or bounds in things which are limited.

Share

  1 comment for “Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz

  1. al
    31/01/2012 at 8:40 pm

    the pictured mathematician is Newton

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *